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Environment

Discover how we are protecting the Gold Coast's natural environment - our spectacular beaches, hinterland ranges, bushland and waterways - and how you can help.

Floating Reed Beds

Floating reed beds are rafts of vegetation used in lakes to treat water quality issues. Council currently has a trial of floating reed beds in place at Lake Lomandra which has showed some positive results in water quality. The benefits of floating reed beds include treating stormwater runoff. They are also versatile, cost-effective and provide habitat for wildlife.

Robina Lakes and Lake Hugh Muntz have been chosen for a trial of floating reed beds due to:

  • their high nutrient level
  • a range of water quality issues
  • a history of algal blooms
  • concerned residents
  • the low flow and turnover of lake water
  • the large number of stormwater inflows.

Robina Lakes

Council has constructed and installed floating reed beds opposite Gabriels Court (A), opposite Iris Place (B) and opposite Mosman Road (C).

Floating reed bed locations A and B

Floating reed bed locations A and B at Robina Lakes

Floating reed bed location C

Floating reed bed location C at Robina Lakes

Lake Hugh Muntz

Council has constructed and installed floating reed beds adjacent to Haselwood Court and the park (1), opposite Moriatta Park off Wild Duck Drive (2), and opposite Otaway Park on Halborne Drive (3).

Lake Hugh Muntz Floating Reed Bed

Floating reed bed location 1 at Lake Hugh Muntz

Lake Hugh Muntz Floating Reed Bed

Floating reed bed location 2 at Lake Hugh Muntz

Lake Hugh Muntz Floating Reed Bed

Floating reed bed location 3 at Lake Hugh Muntz

It should be noted that these floating reed beds are a trial only and just one part of the solution to improving water quality.

Find the link to the Lake Hugh Muntz YouTube video below.

March 2013 Update

Maintenance work was recently conducted by Council contractors on the three floating reed beds located in Lake Hugh Muntz, Mermaid Waters.

Approximately 95 per cent of the plant species needed to be replaced due to die-back caused by recent extreme weather conditions. Carex Appressa has been selected for the replanting due to its high resilience to challenging climatic conditions.

During the maintenance work, weeds were removed from the reed beds and bird netting was inspected and all holes repaired.

The floating reed beds appeared to be in good order and in their correct positions. It is expected that once the reeds have matured, the bird netting will be removed.

Council and its contractors will continue to monitor the floating reed beds during the 12 month trial. This web page will be regularly updated with relevant information regarding the trial.