City of Gold Coast

Navigation Search
Back 

Gold Coast Beach Nourishment Project

Click to enlargeFinal Day of nourishment – 28 September 2017 – Cavill Avenue, Surfers Paradise

Final day of nourishment 28 September
2017 – Cavill Avenue, Surfers Paradise.

City of Gold Coast delivered a major beach nourishment project from June to October 2017. The Gold Coast Beach Nourishment Project (GCBNP) increased the volume of sand available along vulnerable sections of our coastline to buffer against future storms and coastal erosion.

The GCBNP is part of the Ocean Beaches Strategy 2013-23, ensuring our beaches are clean, healthy, safe and accessible now and into the future.

Find answers to frequently asked questions about our beach nourishment project below.

Beach nourishment progress by suburb

Total percentage of sand delivered: 100 per cent as of  October 2017.

Surfers Paradise

Nourishment update at Surfers Paradise (Southern Narrowneck carpark to First Avenue)

Sand nourishment is 100 per cent complete as of October 2017. The increased volume of sand along this section of coastline is 566,842 cubic metres.

Broadbeach

Nourishment update at Broadbeach (Wharf Road to Ventura Road)

Sand nourishment is 100 per cent complete as of October 2017. The increased volume of sand along this section of coastline is 486,595 cubic metres.

Mermaid Beach

Nourishment update at Mermaid Beach (Cronulla Avenue to Chairlift Avenue East)

Sand nourishment is 100 per cent complete as of October 2017. The increased volume of sand along this section of coastline is 564,491 cubic metres.

Miami Beach

Nourishment update at Miami Beach (Chairlift Avenue East to Sixth Avenue)

Sand nourishment is 100 per cent complete as of October 2017. The increased volume of sand along this section of coastline is 939,002 cubic metres.

Palm Beach

Nourishment update at Palm Beach (Nineteenth Avenue to southern end of Palm Beach)

Sand nourishment is 100 per cent complete as of October 2017. The increased volume of sand along this section of coastline is 469,828 cubic metres.

Find out the latest information on the Palm Beach Shoreline Project.


Project update – 25 October 2017

An international dredging and beach nourishment tender was advertised from October to November 2016. The contract was awarded to RN Dredging Pty Ltd in March 2017.

The beach nourishment works have now been completed with the final day of works being Thursday 28 September, 2017.

The total amount of sand delivered during the beach nourishment project was 3,026,758 cubic metres.

Over time, the sand will move with the coast’s natural processes, adding extra sand to our beaches and protecting one of our City’s biggest assets from future coastal hazards.

The City will continue to monitor the movement of sand along our coastline to ensure our beaches are clean, healthy, safe and accessible now and into the future.

Click to enlargeGold Coast Beach Nourishment Project – Sand placement overview.

Gold Coast Beach Nourishment Project – Sand placement overview.

 

Beach nourishment history

The Gold Coast beaches have endured a number of significant storm events in recorded history which have often resulted in serious coastal erosion. Analysis of 40 years of historical monitoring data has concluded that this vulnerability to erosion and storm damage will not be mitigated through natural sand movement alone.

Beach nourishment projects have been undertaken on the Gold Coast since the 1960s. They are designed to mimic natural coastal processes and allow sand to shift continuously in response to changing waves and water levels.

Nourishment locations

Identified locations for beach nourishment as part of the GCBNP are Palm Beach and along northern Gold Coast beaches from Miami to Main Beach.

Click to enlarge
Gold Coast beach nourishment project - Palm Beach

GCBNP Palm Beach

Gold Coast beach nourishment project - Miami to Main Beach

GCBNP Miami to Main Beach

Project aims

The objective of the Gold Coast Beach Nourishment Project is to provide a cost effective, innovative, environmentally and socially acceptable solution to maintain a suitable beach width to buffer future erosion impact. The project aims to:

  • reduce the vulnerability of the beach and beachfront development to storm damage
  • protect, and if practical enhance the beach amenity for the community
  • provide a sustainable, cost-effective solution
  • avoid or mitigate adverse environmental and social impacts.

Project method

Survey vessel

Numerous studies have informed the project design, such as the study of coastal data captured through wave buoys, beach surveys, camera monitoring and computer modelling.

A survey vessel (pictured) will be working at Palm Beach and from Miami to Main Beach from April to October. This vessel will be surveying the level of the sea bed and monitoring the sand placed by the dredge as the project progresses.

A ‘design with nature’ approach is being taken to deliver the Gold Coast Beach Nourishment Project. The solution involves a specialised dredge vessel transferring sand from our offshore sand reserves and placing it around the nearshore wave breaking zone.

The sand will be collected from our offshore sand reserves and distributed around the wave breaking zone by bottom dumping and rainbowing. Bottom dumping is where the collected sand is deposited to the wave breaking zone through the vessel hull. Rainbowing is where the sand is projected from the bow of the vessel to the wave breaking zone as a sand/water mixture.

Post sand placement

The additional sand that is deposited around the wave breaking zone will not be placed directly on the dry beach. This sand will move with the coast’s natural processes over time, adding extra sand supply to our beaches and acting as a natural buffer during storms.

This nearshore beach nourishment technique has a proven successful history on Gold Coast beaches.

Stakeholder engagement

A comprehensive stakeholder engagement plan continues to be delivered as part of this project. A number of stakeholder meetings have taken place with key stakeholders including a selection of community group leaders who have represented their members. The meetings have provided an opportunity for stakeholders to ask questions and for the project team to respond to, and address any issues while informing stakeholders about the need for the project and method of delivery.

Evan Thomas
President Miami Beach Surf Life Saving Club

"I am OK with the project. It is well planned and will provide added protection to the City's ocean beaches.

The meeting was very useful for the clubs to learn about the project and potential impacts and advice needed to provide to members to ensure safety. In addition the project as we were able to provide advice to the team on the best person to contact to ensure communications with clubs is rapid when required. We also identified key dates and activities that will be occurring during the project that will need to be managed."


James Brooks
President Mermaid Nobbys Miami Boardriders Club Inc

"I feel encouraged by the prospect of having additional good quality sandbanks which will provide better quality waves. Understanding that the initial purpose of the nourishment program is geared towards foreshore stabilisation/protection but are all hopeful of a win-win.

As far as the entire nourishment program is concerned we are all hopeful of achieving the projected outcomes. However, there is a collective of members who display strong scepticism regarding the power of the ocean and its ability to undo what has been put in place.

All members have been encouraged to access the web site as to get a better understanding of the project."

More information

For more information on the Gold Coast Beach Nourishment Project, download the fact sheet (PDF 240kb), or email: beachnourishment@goldcoast.qld.gov.au

Beach Nourishment - Before

Narrowneck (1998), low tide - before nourishment works

Beach Nourishment - After

After nourishment works

Gold Coast Beach Nourishment Project - footage courtesy of Nine Gold Coast News

Back  Return to top