Project Kirra

Aerial photo of Kirra Point GroyneCity of Gold Coast commenced works in July 2013 on Project Kirra (#projectkirra) to reinstate Kirra Point groyne by 30 metres to its original constructed length.

Background

In 1972 two groynes, at Kirra Point and Miles Street, were constructed to mitigate coastal erosion along southern beaches.

In 1996 Council undertook works to remove 30 metres of Kirra groyne after the commencement of the Tweed River Entrance Sand Bypass Project. These works were undertaken to assist with the movement of increased volumes of sand resulting from the bypass project.

As the movement of sand along southern Gold Coast beaches has returned to more natural levels, community stakeholders have recently expressed a desire to improve recreational surfing amenity at Kirra Point, and that the City should consider reinstating Kirra Groyne to its original constructed length of 180 metres.

An allocation of $800,000 has been included in the 2013-14 budget for the re-instatement of Kirra groyne to its original constructed length. The works, branded as 'Project Kirra', form a key element of the Mayor's strategic initiative to invest in the future management of Gold Coast foreshores and align to the City's Ocean Beaches Strategy (G12.1023.011).

Specialist rock materials

Project Kirra involves the placement of specialist rock material in layers to form the groyne structure. The rock armour layers are the most important elements of the groyne as they resist wave energy and must meet design specifications.

The reinstatement works will require both primary (10-15 tonnes) and secondary (5-8 tonnes) rock layers.

To meet project requirements, the City will be sourcing suitable rock materials from a number of sites in Queensland and New South Wales, including the same material used to construct Kirra Groyne and Kirra seawalls in 1972.

The transport of massive rock (10-15 tonnes) to Kirra requires large truck floats and special arrangements to use public roads.

City of Gold Coast partners with the Griffith Centre for Coastal Management

City of Gold Coast's project team have partnered to deliver the works with the Griffith Centre for Coastal Management. The partnering will include sharing of information around construction methods, testing and certification, and coastal engineering issues.

The Centre for Coastal Management is a research centre based in the Science, Environment, Engineering and Technology Group of Griffith University.

Schedule of works

Kirra Groyne pictured in June 2013 and December 2013As a result of the lengthened groyne, sand movement has already begun with the beach width increasing as seen in the December 2013 photo.

Further coastal imaging resources can befound on external websites below.

December 2013 works update - Project complete

On Friday 13 December 2013 the final rocks were placed at Project Kirra. This milestone represents the completion of the major works phase.

The City of Gold Coast's project team have installed over 7000 tonnes of specialised rock material to reinstate Kirra Groyne to the original constructed length.

Final works are currently underway to reinstate Queen Elizabeth Park so that the area is ready for the Christmas holiday period.

Site fencing will be removed and will be open to the public by close of business Friday 20 December 2013.

November 2013 works update

Work continues on the Kirra Point groyne. While suitable rock supply has been difficult, City of Gold Coast engineers have sourced alternative supplies to ensure that the project will be completed within the original timeframe.

Preparation of the groyne crest to accommodate heavy machinery has been completed and all specialist plant, including a heavy lift rock grabber, are working on site.

Quarrying activities at Petrie Brisbane were underway during October to produce large armour rocks. Progressive deliveries of rock material have been completed after quarry stockpiling and testing.

The project team have secured 50 per cent of the required specialist rock materials and established stockpiles on site at Elizabeth Park. The team is now focused on securing last remaining massive armour rocks, which are sized between 10 - 20 tonnes. An additional quarry supplier at Staplyton has been engaged to meet the project requirements and ensure planned construction milestones are achieved.

The haulage of remaining massive armour rocks will recommence this month with the final delivery anticipated by 13 December.

Completion of the works is dependant upon weather conditions, coastal conditions and the supply of suitable rock materials.

October 2013 works update

Work to begin reinstating Kirra Point groyne is underway. Specialised equipment required to place large rocks has now arrived and has been commissioned for use in the project.

Preparation of the groyne crest to accommodate access by heavy machinery will be completed by 11 October.

Quarrying and transport of large armour stone is continuing, with traffic control in place to coordinate delivery.

Completion of the reinstatement of works will be heavily dependent on weather, ocean conditions and supply of suitable rock.

It is anticipated that the placement of large armour rocks will start during October, with the final stage of works being completed by December 2013.

September 2013 works update

The supply of rock to site for Project Kirra commenced.

This material is being transported to site via large truck floats. The transport route is via the M1 through Miles Street around Marine Parade at Kirra Point.

Find the link below to view the Kirra Point schematic map.

August 2013 works update

The initial stage of works commenced on 29 July. This involved the establishment of access for heavy machines, site fencing and stockpiling of smaller rock material.

The reinstatement of the armour layers for Kirra Groyne requires over 385 rocks each weighing between five and 15 tonnes.

All armour rock must pass testing to ensure it is sufficiently durable and able to meet design specifications. The project team is sourcing suitable rock from three sites across Queensland and northern New South Wales.

The extraction and testing of rock at source quarries is currently underway in preparation for transport.

Construction impacts

Large plant and equipment will be operating onsite during the works schedule. Traffic control will be in place to allow heavy vehicles to access the site intermittently.

Areas of the foreshore and beach may be closed off for the temporary stockpiling of rock materials.

Local residents may experience some noise during the stockpiling and placement of rocks. There will also be temporary arrangements in place for pedestrian movements through QEII Park.

Access to Kirra Point groyne will be restricted during the construction works and boat access around Kirra Point groyne will be restricted during work hours.

The City's construction team will endeavour to minimise impacts during the works.

Work hours

Works will be undertaken Monday to Friday between 7am and 4pm.

Some works may be undertaken on Saturday depending on the construction schedule and impacts from weather and periods of large swell.

More information

For more information please contact City of Gold Coast's Project Team on 1300 GOLDCOAST (1300 465 326) or mail@goldcoast.qld.gov.au.

Images courtesy of Tweed River Entrance Sand Bypassing Project (New South Wales and Queensland)

Key information

  • What is Project Kirra?

    Project Kirra commenced works in July 2013 to reinstate Kirra Point groyne by 30 metres to its original constructed length.

  • When was the Kirra Point groyne first constructed?

    In 1972 two groynes were constructed, at Kirra Point and Miles Street.

  • Why was the Kirra Point groyne constructed?

    The purpose of the groyne was to mitigate coastal erosion along southern beaches.

  • What is the Kirra Point groyne made from?

    The Kirra Point groyne comprises special basalt rock material in layers to form the groyne structure. The rock layers are graded according to weight.  

    • Primary layer - 15 tonnes
    • Secondary layer - 10 to 15 tonnes
    • Core layers - 1 to 5 tonnes
  • When and why was the Kirra Point shortened by 30 metres?

    In 1996 City of Gold Coast undertook works to remove 30 metres of Kirra groyne after the commencement of the Tweed River Entrance Sand Bypass Project (TRESPB). These works were completed to assist the movement of increased volumes of sand resulting from the sand bypass project.

  • Why is City of Gold Coast extending the Kirra Point groyne again in 2013?

    Sand movement along southern beaches has returned to more natural levels in recent times and the local surfing community has asked City of Gold Coast to bring back the Kirra Point groyne.

    Community stakeholders expressed a desire to improve the recreational surfing amenity at Kirra Point, and asked the City to consider providing funding in the 2013-14 budget for the reinstatement of Kirra Point groyne to its original length of 180 metres.

  • How will Kirra groyne be reinstated?

    Project Kirra involves the placement of specialist rock material in layers to form the groyne structure. The use of specialised plant and equipment is required to stockpile and progressively install the rock layers from a working platform on the crest of the existing groyne.

    Temporary staging areas will be in place around park spaces to accommodate the machinery and equipment and rock stockpiles.

    The works will include the transportation of massive rock materials (10-15 tonnes each) using trucks and floats with special arrangements to use public roads.

  • Where does the rock for this project come from?

    To meet the project requirements, the City will be sourcing suitable rock materials from a number of sites in Queensland and New South Wales, including the same material used to construct the Kirra groyne and Kirra seawalls in 1972.

  • Is the Griffith University - Griffith Centre for Coastal Management (GCCM) involved in this current effort to reinstate the groyne? What role will it play?

    City of Gold Coast is partnering with the Griffith Centre for Coastal Management (GCCM) to deliver the works.

    This will include the sharing of information around construction methods, testing and certification, and coastal engineering issues.

  • Who are the key community stakeholders for this project?

    Key stakeholders include:  

    • Kirra Point Incorporated
    • Coolangatta Surf Life Saving Club
    • Kirra Surf Life Saving Club
    • Gold Coast Surf Council
    • Surfrider Foundation – Tweed / Gold Coast Chapter
    • Kirra Surfriders Club
    • North Kirra Surf Life Saving Club
  • Who is providing the funding for the Kirra Point groyne project?

    The City of Gold Coast has provided an allocation of $800,000 within its 2013-14 financial year budget for the reinstatement of Kirra groyne back to its original constructed length.

  • What is the time frame for the Kirra Point groyne project?

    Construction commenced from 29 July 2013. Completion of the works is dependant upon weather conditions, ocean conditions and the supply of suitable rock materials. It is anticipated the works will be completed by December 2013.

  • Who is responsible for the Kirra Point groyne construction work?

    City of Gold Coast’s project team - consisting of Engineering Services Projects, Design and Construction branches is responsible for the works.

  • Will construction works disrupt use of Queen Elizabeth Park in Coolangatta?

    There will be temporary pedestrian traffic diversions in Queen Elizabeth Park and along the Oceanway during the construction phase. Traffic control will be in place during the works for both pedestrian and vehicles. Temporary diversions will be in place to maintain pedestrian movement along the foreshore.

  • Who do I contact at City of Gold Coast if I have questions about this project?

    If you require further information please feel free to contact City of Gold Coast's project team via email at gcccmail@goldcoast.qld.gov.au or visit cityofgoldcoast.com.au/projectkirra for more information.