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Gold Coast history and heritage

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Burleigh history

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Click to enlarge Camp on the beach at Burleigh Heads, circa 1912. Photographer unknown.

Camp on the beach at Burleigh Heads,
circa 1912. Photographer unknown.

Looking towards Little and Big Burleigh Heads, circa 1885. Photographer unknown.

Looking towards Little and Big Burleigh
Heads, circa 1885. Photographer unknown.

In 1840, surveyor J. R. Warner was commissioned to survey the coastline near Moreton Bay.  

Warner named the headland near Tallebudgera Creek, Burly Head because of its massive appearance. Over the years Burly was changed to Burleigh.

William Hanlon, whose childhood memories of the district went back to the 1870s, recorded in 1935 that for local Aborigines, Big Burleigh was Jellurgul; Little Burleigh was Jebbribillum or the Waddy of Jebreen.

In another article, Hanlon referred to Jellurgul as meaning sugar bag or bee's nest.

Another identity who knew the area and its inhabitants well from the 1870s was Archibald Meston. He recalled fifty years later that the local Aborigines called Big Burleigh Jayling (black) and Gumbelmoy (rock), after the volcanic black basalt rock of the headland.

Information and images provided by the City of Gold Coast Local Studies Collection.

Sources of information and further reading

Longhurst, R., The Heart of Paradise, p.9.

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