Council Plan

Council Plan 2022–2027

The City's Council Plan 2022–2027 supports the implementation of the City Vision and is structured around the 6 Gold Coast 2032 themes. It describes the priority outcomes we are working towards and our measures of success over a 5-year period. These outcomes help prioritise investments and service delivery based on our communities’ aspirations.


The Local Government Act 2009 requires the Corporate Plan (known as the Council Plan 2022–2027) to outline the strategic direction of the local government. The Council Plan must include performance measures for measuring progress and incorporate community engagement. It must also include the objectives and significant business activities of each Commercialised Business Unit.

The Council Plan will direct annual priorities, adopted by Council in the City’s Annual Plan which incorporates the City Budget and City Operational Plan. Implementation of the plan is supported by robust planning, responsible management and active engagement of the Gold Coast community.

Message from the Mayor

I am proud to lead a council that has a strong and transparent vision for the future.

Protecting our lifestyle and planning for one-million-plus residents means the decisions we make today will have a huge bearing on every aspect of our city and the way we live – from transport to open space, community centres, sporting fields, parking, public transport and events.

Our Council Plan 2022–2027 lays out Council's commitment to the residents of the Gold Coast.

As Mayor, I am focused on ensuring strong fiscal discipline to every decision we make on the floor of council chamber. People rightly expect quality services, at a price they can afford, and we are achieving that while keeping a lid on our debt.

Equally, people expect certainty when it comes to how the city is growing, where future residential infrastructure is being established and how our transport strategies interface with the growing population.

Since 2012 when I was first elected Mayor, every Councillor has worked tirelessly to deliver a low-rates future. We have achieved that by ensuring the past 11 annual budgets have delivered any rate increase at, or below, the Consumer Price Index (CPI). This plan sets in concrete that commitment until 2027.

Just as residents want certainty, the business community also wants certainty when it comes to fees and charges, planning provisions and incentive projects. Our city has in excess of 71,000 registered businesses – the true backbone of our economy and the major employer of Gold Coasters.

I encourage you to explore our Council Plan and commend the City's administration for delivering the projects we all want to see in this great city of ours.

Tom Tate BE (UNSW)
Mayor

Chief Executive Officer's message

It's in setting our sights on the future Gold Coast that we are reminded of the many great things about living here.

Developing our Council Plan 2022–2027 with input from the community has given us the opportunity to define what's important and then set a roadmap for the way in which the City will achieve our collective vision "Inspired by Lifestyle, Driven by Opportunity".

This plan defines our priorities for investment and service delivery and sets our measures of success to ensure we're meeting expectations.

It reflects the sentiment of our organisation, our Council and most importantly the people who live, visit, work or study here.

Taking the time to update our Council Plan allows us to recognise the achievements we've made, revisit our priorities, introduce initiatives, and reshape them where needed.

We are proud of our resilient, kind-spirited community, with residents supporting and looking out for each other, especially over the past two years of overcoming the challenges of COVID-19.

This 5-year plan shines a light on what we want to be known for as a city. We want the Gold Coast to be distinctive, sustainable, ambitious and creative, and your Council recognised as Australia's finest.

A huge amount of research has been undertaken to help refresh the Council Plan. And we will continue to listen to our community and partners, and work in harmony to ensure we are delivering a city that is thriving.

Tim Baker
Chief Executive Officer


Inspired
by lifestyle.
Driven
by opportunity.

Our Council Plan supports the implementation of the City Vision.
It describes the outcomes we are working towards and our measures of success.

DIVERSE THRIVING ECONOMY

Outcomes

We have sustainable economic growth in the industries and sectors that offer opportunity.

We develop, attract and retain the best talent in our city.

We are the best place to visit in Australia.

Measures of success
  • Gross regional product
  • Growth in tertiary education sector
  • Visitation spend

VIBRANT LIFESTYLE

Outcomes

We are a safe, active and healthy community.

We have accessible community and cultural infrastructure which supports social connections.

Measures of success
  • Perception of safety
  • Physical activity ranking
  • Community infrastructure accessibility and visitation
  • Satisfaction with arts and culture

CONNECTED COMMUNITY

Outcomes

We provide safe and sustainable travel choices to enable us to move around the city easily.

We have beaches, parklands, waterways and natural places that are accessible and enjoyed by everyone.

We are a digitally connected city.

Measures of success
  • Travel time reliability
  • Daily trips using public, active and shared transport
  • Public outdoor amenity accessibility
  • Digital connectivity

NATURALLY UNIQUE

Outcomes

We have critical nature corridors throughout the city.

We balance city growth and our natural environment.

Measures of success
  • Connectivity of natural assets
  • Native vegetation cover

LIVEABLE PLACES

Outcomes

We plan city growth and ensure sufficient capacity and types of housing to meet future needs.

We manage our resources for a sustainable future.

We have a prepared community and a natural and built environment resilient to hazards.

Measures of success
  • Residential growth management
  • Resource recovery and reuse – waste and wastewater
  • Beach erosion protection
  • Disaster resilience

ONE CITY

Outcomes

We address the challenge of climate change through practical and sensible solutions that deliver climate resilience.

We partner to leverage emerging opportunities for the city ahead of the Brisbane 2032 Olympic and Paralympic Games.

We are a high performing, customer focused organisation which delivers value for money services to our community.

Measures of success
  • City-wide greenhouse gas emissions
  • City pride
  • Average residential rate rise

 

The Council Plan describes our Commercialised Business Unit's objectives and significant business activities.

GOLD COAST WATER AND GOLD COAST WASTE MANAGEMENT OBJECTIVES

  • WE ENSURE ZERO HARM
    We ensure the health and safety of ourselves, our environment and our community
  • WE STRIVE FOR SATISFIED CUSTOMERS
    We provide value for money, innovative, customer focused services
  • WE MANAGE FINANCES RESPONSIBLY
    We balance life-cycle costs and service prices to sustain our City
  • WE PROVIDE RELIABLE SERVICES
    We plan, build, operate, maintain and renew assets prudently and efficiently
  • WE SUCCEED THROUGH SKILLED PEOPLE
    We engage, develop and empower our people to continuously improve our business

Gold Coast Water

SIGNIFICANT BUSINESS ACTIVITIES

  • purchase and distribute water
  • provide water, recycled water and sewerage services to customers
  • charge customers for relevant services
  • manage customer enquiries, service requests and complaints
  • perform functions relating to trade waste and seepage water as a sewerage service provider
  • perform planning and development assessment functions under the Planning Act
  • anything else likely to complement or enhance a function mentioned above – specifically analytical laboratory services directly to external customers

Gold Coast Waste Management

SIGNIFICANT BUSINESS ACTIVITIES

  • promote waste avoidance and reduction and resource recovery and efficiency actions
  • reduce the consumption of natural resources and minimise the disposal of waste by encouraging waste avoidance and the recovery, re-use and recycling of waste
  • minimise the overall impact of waste generation and disposal
  • ensure a shared responsibility between government, business, industry and the community in waste management and resource recovery
  • support and implement national frameworks, objectives and priorities for waste management and resource recovery.

Signature Actions and Measures of Success

Each Council Plan outcome includes signature actions and measures of success to ensure we're meeting expectations. Performance against the Council Plan is reported and published on a quarterly and annual basis.

Diverse thriving economy

Outcome: We have sustainable economic growth in the industries and sectors that offer opportunity

Signature Actions 22–23 Role of Council

Support the Gold Coast Health and Knowledge Precinct, Southport to become a world-class renowned centre of ideas, research and innovation

Partner

Investment attraction funding for companies wanting to relocate to the Gold Coast, with a focus on export and knowledge based industries.

Partner

Facilitate export and international business outcomes across established and newly identified global markets.

Advocator

Outcome: We develop, attract and retain the best talent in our city

Signature Actions 22–23 Role of Council

Continue to support Study Gold Coast in its core focus areas – attraction, experience, retention and employability.

Partner

Outcome: We are the best place to visit in Australia

Signature Actions 22–23 Role of Council

Continue to support Destination Gold Coast in its vision for the Gold Coast to be recognised locally, nationally and internationally as one of the world’s great tourist and business event destinations.

Partner

Continue to support Major Events Gold Coast in delivering, attracting and supporting distinctive world-class events.

Partner

Security and lighting improvements to Orchid Avenue and Cavill Avenue, Surfers Paradise.

Service Provider

Measure of success Definition Baseline Interim 23-24 Target 2027
Gross Regional Product Measures the total value of all final goods and services produced in the local economy. $39.2B p.a. $43B p.a. $46B p.a.
Growth in tertiary education sector Measures the contribution that education beyond high school makes to the local economy. $655M p.a. $800M p.a. $865M p.a.
Visitation spend Measures the growth in international, domestic overnight and daytrip visitor expenditure on the Gold Coast. 0% 116.8% 153%

Vibrant lifestyle

Outcome: We are a safe, active and healthy community

Signature Actions 22–23 Role of Council

Deliver actions in the Homelessness Action Plan 2024.

Advocator

Commence design of the Kerkin Road Adventure Parklands, Pimpama.

Service Provider

Provide additional CCTV cameras in expanding urban villages to enhance the effectiveness of the Gold Coast Safety Camera Network.

Service Provider

Progress detailed design and complete environmental studies for Greenheart, in the heart of the city.

Service Provider

Outcome: We have accessible community and cultural infrastructure which supports social connections

Signature Actions 22–23 Role of Council

Design redevelopment of the Palm Beach Aquatic Centre including indoor program pools, facilities, dry programming spaces and the entry/reception.

Service Provider

Plan and design performing arts infrastructure at HOTA, Home of the Arts, Evandale to include a performing arts theatre, studio and digital spaces.

Partner

Measure of success Definition Baseline Interim 23&ndash24 Target 2027
Perception of safety Measures the percentage of people who feel safe in the neighbourhood during the day. 72.74% 73.5% 75%
Physical activity ranking Measures the Queensland Local Government ranking for the percentage of residents undertaking sufficient activity to meet the National Physical Activity Guidelines. Ranking at 5th Ranking at 4th Ranking at 3rd
Community infrastructure accessibility and visitations Measures the percentage of people who are satisfied with the level of disability access in community and cultural facilities. To be established in 22–23 To be established in 22–23 To be established in 22–23
Measures the number of visitations across the network of Council-owned community facilities.
Satisfaction with arts and culture Measures the percentage of people satisfied with the quality, accessibility and value of Gold Coast Arts and Cultural experiences. 76% Maintain or improve from baseline Maintain or improve from baseline

Connected Community

Outcome: We provide safe and sustainable travel choices to enable us to move around the city easily

Signature Actions 22–23 Role of Council

Cash contribution to the State Government to construct Light Rail Stage 3 to connect the existing rail system at Broadbeach South to Burleigh Heads.

Partner

Upgrade along Yawalpah Road, including design and construction of a duplication of the railway bridge overpass to support new development in the Pimpama/Coomera region.

Service Provider

Upgrade of bus stops to comply with the Disability Standards for Accessible Public Transport 2002.

Service Provider

Upgrade intersection at Mirambeena Drive and Creek Street, Pimpama to reduce traffic congestion and address significant traffic growth.

Service Provider

Outcome: We have beaches, parklands, waterways and natural places that are accessible and enjoyed by everyone

Signature Actions 22–23 Role of Council

Renew and upgrade the Tallebudgera Creek boardwalk for form a connection between the oceanway and the shared path in Tallebudgera Creek Park.

Service Provider

Develop and establish rainforest and coastal vegetation and nature-based recreational opportunities at Federation Walk Coastal Reserve, The Spit, Main Beach.

Service Provider

Outcome: We are a digitally connected city

Signature Actions 22–23 Role of Council

Support connection of additional City of Gold Coast sites to the One Network to provide more resilient services and enhance user experience.

Service Provider

Measure of success Definition Baseline Interim 23–24 Target 2027
Travel time reliability Measures the reliability of customer travel times in both directions on key strategic road corridors for defined peak time periods. To be established in FY 22–23 85% of samples performing within planned performance levels 85% of samples performing within planned performance levels
Daily trips using public, active and shared transport Measures the percentage of daily trips within the Gold Coast made by public, active and shared transport (non-private motor vehicle modes). 13.40% 16.40% 21.0%
Public outdoor amenity accessibility Measures the percentage of people who find it easy to access the City’s beaches, parklands, waterways and natural places. To be established in 22–23 To be established in 22–23 To be established in 22–23
Digital connectivity Measures the percentage of Gold Coast homes and businesses that have access to next generation digital connectivity. To be established in 22–23 To be established in 22–23 To be established in 22–23

Naturally Unique

Outcome: We have critical nature corridors throughout the city

Signature Actions 22–23 Role of Council

Continue to implement and enhance the Natural Areas Acquisition Program to secure strategic parcels of land to consolidate the natural asset network and protect environmental values.

Leader

Develop and implement a critical nature corridor to connect, protect and restore strategic areas.

Partner

Maintain and enhance riparian zones at various sites to improve the health of waterways in the City.

Partner

Outcome: We balance city growth and our natural environment

Signature Actions 22–23 Role of Council

Coordinate establishment of a Restoration Roadmap to work toward native vegetation targets.

Partner

Continue to implement the City Plan to manage residential growth with the natural environment.

Partner

Remove Luscombe Weir and revegetate stream.

Partner

Measure of success Definition Baseline Interim 23–24 Target 2027
Connectivity of natural assets Measures the hectares of native vegetation cover within the natural asset network. 60,327.15 hectares Maintain or increase from baseline Maintain or increase from baseline
Measures the number of land acquisitions through the natural areas acquisition program. 0 land acquisitions 4 land acquisitions 10 land acquisitions
Native vegetation cover Measures the percentage of city land area covered in native vegetation. 50.55% Maintain or increase from baseline Maintain or increase from baseline

Liveable Places

Outcome: We plan city growth and ensure sufficient capacity and types of housing to meet future needs

Signature Actions 22–23 Role of Council

Continue to implement the City Plan to balance residential growth with the natural environment.

Leader

Introduce an ongoing Residential Land Supply Analysis Project with the purpose of providing a more comprehensive understanding of residential land supply for the City.

Regulator

Draft the required policy to proactively manage liveability and housing issues when undertaking City Plan functions.

Regulator

Outcome: We manage our resources for a sustainable future

Signature Actions 22–23 Role of Council

Design and construct a recycled water treatment plant at Merrimac Sewerage Treatment Plant to product Class A recycled water.

Service Provider

Deliver infrastructure to expand the recycled water network for improved utilisation of recycled water across the city.

Service Provider

An innovative fit for purpose water supply scheme to service existing recycled water customers in the northern cane fields after the decommissioning of the Beenleigh Sewage Treatment Plant.

Service Provider

Outcome: We have a prepared community and a natural and built environment resilient to hazards

Signature Actions 22–23 Role of Council

Construct a new Disaster and Emergency Management Coordination Centre in Ashmore to ensure the City can adequately manage and respond to emergency situations.

Service Provider

Upgrade drainage works within the Mountain View Catchment, Miami to reduce habitable floor flooding.

Service Provider

Implement a revised bushfire hazard reduction program including fire management planning, fire breaks, fire trail construction and vegetation management.

Service Provider

Measure of success Definition Baseline Interim 23-24 Target 2027
Residential growth management Measures the percentage of new dwellings approved in the city’s consolidation areas (as defined in the SEQ Regional Plan). 65% consolidation 67.5% consolidation 70% consolidation
Resource recovery and reuse – waste and wastewater Measures the percentage of collected waste materials that are recycled, reused or repurposed. 35% 45% 60%
Measures the percentage of collected wastewater that is recycled, reused or repurposed. 25% 30% 35%
Beach erosion protection Measures all areas of the beach profile (beach volume index, beach width and profile volume) to maintain adequate sand buffers along the Gold Coast coastline. 17/23 beaches are On Track 17/23 beaches are On Track 17/23 beaches are On Track
Disaster resilience Measures the city’s resilience to disasters and hazards using elements of the disaster resilience scorecard for cities. Average score of 2 or higher Average score of 3 or higher Average score of 4 or higher

One City

Outcome: We address the challenge of climate change with practical and sensible solutions

Signature Actions 22–23 Role of Council

Implement an Organic Waste Program with a focus on the hospitality sector at Broadbeach and Surfers Paradise to reduce the quantity of organic waste disposal.

Partner

Adopt a carbon accounting framework for Council.

Service Provider

Investigate carbon offset investment opportunities.

Service Provider

Outcome: We partner to leverage emerging opportunities for the city ahead of the Brisbane 2032 Olympic and Paralympic Games

Signature Actions 22–23 Role of Council

Develop the City Legacy Plan providing outcomes and benefits the city would like to realise as a result of partnering in the delivery of the Brisbane 2032 Olympic and Paralympic Games.

Leader

Development of the Gold Coast Sport and Physical Activity Plan to provide direction for the organisation and sport and physical activity industries in delivering health and economic benefits to the city and its residents.

Leader

Outcome: We are a high performing, customer focused organisation which delivers value for money services to our community

Signature Actions 22–23 Role of Council

Develop a new customer portal to offer customers an improved online experience, new features and access to a wider range of City services.

Service Provider

Procure and commence implementation of an online booking system to allow customers to check availability and book a range of City services.

Service Provider

Replace the library management systems to provide customers with a modern, seamless digital interface and enhanced mobile solutions.

Service Provider

Measure of success Definition Baseline Interim 23-24 Target 2027
City-wide greenhouse gas emissions Measures the municipality’s total annual greenhouse gas emissions (t CO2e). To be established in 22–23 To be established in 22–23 To be established in 22–23
City Pride Measures the feelings of pride residents have for the Gold Coast. 90% Maintain or increase from baseline Maintain or increase from baseline
Average residential rate rise Measure the average residential rate rise for the Gold Coast (through a defined formula which can be found it the City’s Annual Plan 2021–22). 1.68% ARRR increase approximate to Brisbane CPI ARRR increase approximate to Brisbane CPI

 

Role of Council

Council undertakes a range of roles and functions to deliver services to our community and working to achieve the outcomes outlined in the Council Plan. The role of Council has been defined as:

Role Definition
Partner Collaborate and bring stakeholders together to achieve shared goals.
Advocator Champion for action on behalf of the city and promote the ambitions of the community.
Service Provider Plan, deliver, maintain and improve services and projects
Leader Demonstrate leadership, promote greater education, and empower community and business engagement.
Regulator Providing good governance through the local laws and policies for the benefit and wellbeing of the community.