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Graffiti projects and murals

City of Gold Coast implements specific evidence-based projects to reduce graffiti in different ways.

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Graffiti projects and murals

We implement specific evidence-based projects to reduce graffiti in different ways. These projects may include working with young people to divert them from criminal behaviour, reducing access to spray paint or beautifying graffiti hotspots.

Artbox

The Artbox project aims to deter graffiti vandalism and beautify our city by installing artwork onto City traffic signal boxes (TSBs) via a high-quality laminate. Unfortunately, TSBs can be frequently vandalised with graffiti due to their prominent location at major intersections. Artwork has proven to be effective in reducing graffiti on these highly visible assets.

Since March 2008, over 127 TSBs have been wrapped across the city, with artworks provided by local artists and community groups who have creatively reflected our unique and vibrant city. This program has proven to be successful in preventing and reducing graffiti vandalism in our city

If you are interested in being involved in Artbox, please email us at communitysafety@goldcoast.qld.gov.au.

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Murals

Pedestrian underpass Helensvale

Click to enlarge Pedestrian Underpass Helensvale

Pedestrian Underpass Helensvale

Pedestrian Underpass Helensvale

The City worked in consultation with local artist Catherine Booth and Helensvale State High School students to create a mural located within the pedestrian underpass at Helensvale.

This location was identified as a graffiti hotspot and suitable for a graffiti prevention treatment. It is hoped the mural will become an integrated community element of the underpass, whilst also assisting to ensure the long term effectiveness of the mural as a graffiti prevention treatment.

Helensvale High School students created the mural design with the theme of 'Past, Present, Future' representing their community through a journey of time. Each student designed their own individual section to form part of the whole mural, and worked together to create a cohesive design and experience for pedestrians.

The mural reflects Helensvale's history as a farming community, containing images of cane fields, cattle, wildlife and bushland. It also recognises Helana White and the evolution of photography. It then takes the pedestrian into iconic symbols of contemporary Gold Coast life - a library, a theme park slide, pristine beaches, high rise buildings, coffee shops, music and festivals. A pixelated tree represents the digital age - the students want to encourage visitors and residents to move beyond technology and live and enjoy the Gold Coast's lifestyle. The mural finishes with their aspiration that the future will bring unity (by the joining of the hands to signify equality), celebrate diversity, multiculturalism and be a society that respects individual choice.

The design is intended to unravel layers of meaning and contribute to the creation of a unique 'sense of place' and make reference to the people, place and stories in an imaginative and accessible way.

The project was funded under a grant from the Australian Government (The Proceeds of Crime Act 2002).

Arthur Earle Park, Nerang

Local artist Libby Harward was engaged to develop the design for this community art mural in consultation with the local community and representation from The Traditional Owners, Yugambeh People. The design reflects elements of Nerang's historical background.

The shovelnose shark translates to 'Neerang'. The paddle steamer 'Maid of Sker' currently resides beside the Nerang River and represents vessels trading up and down the river. Playing cards are associated with skating, and blue lines and connecting circles represent skate park users travelling between parks. Feathers honour the Polynesian culture, and the water lily, reeds and bunyip pay homage to a love story of the Nerang River.

We hope the mural will become a local attraction and talking point, as well as acting as a long-term graffiti prevention deterrent. The project was funded by a grant from the Australian Government (The Proceeds of Crime Act 2002).

Arthur Earle Park mural

Colourful community mural in Parkwood

Local artist Fiona Hutchinson-Mackenzie was engaged to develop the design for a community art mural at Abbott Park in Parkwood, aimed at deterring graffiti vandalism. Following numerous reports of graffiti in the park, it was felt that a mural would help to prevent graffiti and beautify the area, thereby enhancing feelings of safety and community pride.

The mural design was undertaken in consultation with the local community and Neighbourhood Watch representatives. The colourful mural has become a local attraction and talking point, and should act as a long-term graffiti prevention deterrent. The project was funded by a grant from the State Government (GraffitiSTOP).

Colourful community mural in Parkwood Colourful community mural in Parkwood

Luke Harrop bike track

Luke Harrop bike track mural

The City recently engaged local artists from Inter-urban Arts to complete a mural on the entry bridge to the Luke Harrop bike track located in Runaway Bay. The track was named after Luke Harrop, a local triathlete who tragically passed away after an accident in 2002.

Following ongoing graffiti in the area, a mural project was identified as being suitable as a graffiti prevention measure, whilst also improving visual amenity in the area. The local community, and particularly young people, were consulted during the mural planning and design stage, to ensure that the mural reflected local themes and to increase community pride relating to the project.

The mural design represents the various sports played in nearby local facilities, and an image of Luke Harrop is also depicted. The Runaway Bay area has a strong indigenous culture and this is also represented in the mural by the small sketches of animals detailed in the background.

Stoner Family Park mural

Stoner Family Park mural

The City worked with Merrimac Neighbourhood Watch (Nerang 7) and artists from Gold Coast Youth Arts (lead by Libby Harward) to complete a mural on a basketball rebound wall at Stoner Family Park, Merrimac.

Following numerous reports of graffiti in the park, it was felt that a mural would help to prevent graffiti and beautify the area, thereby enhancing feelings of safety and community pride.

The Stoner Family Park mural was inspired by members of the community who have a proud connection with the history of the local area. Through the use of farm animals and local flora and fauna, the mural reflects the area's earlier dairy farming activities. Indigenous connections to the land are also recognised by the use of concentric circle dot work. The mural is painted in bright colours to brighten the landscape and promote a feeling of freedom and celebration.

Spray Paint Theft Reduction Project

In accordance with amendments to the Summery Offences Act 2005, the sale of spray paint is prohibited to persons under the age of 18. However, statistics show many vandals obtain spray paint for graffiti by stealing it. The City is working with retail outlets that sell spray paint cans and encouraging them to secure these products.

Staff have visited all Gold Coast retailers and asked them to lock cans away, keep them in a storeroom or display them behind the counter and have customers request them. Residents are asked to support this project by shopping at places that have adopted responsible retailing practices.

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