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Caring for our dunes

Stable dunes are critical to the health of our beautiful beaches. Caring for our dunes is a collaborative effort from both the City and beach users.

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Caring for our dunes

Stable dunes are critical to the health of our beautiful beaches. They also form a crucial defence against erosion, protecting people, properties and infrastructure.

Native vegetation plays an important role in stabilising our dune systems, protecting nearby properties and beach users from wind and salt spray, and is a natural shade tool. It is also valuable habitat for our native wildlife.

Caring for our dunes

Caring for our dunes is a collaborative effort from both the City and beach users. The City works to protect our dunes and promote healthy native vegetation by:

  • controlling weeds and exotic plants
  • planting native endemic species
  • installing dune fencing and maintaining public access ways
  • supporting community activities under the BeachCare program (administered by the Griffith Centre for Coastal Management)
  • beach cleaning and litter patrols.

Beach users can help ensure our dunes are resilient and healthy by:

  • using designated beach access ways and keeping off the dune vegetation
  • disposing of rubbish and green waste in the bins provided
  • joining in local BeachCare activities
  • reporting camping and vandalism as soon as possible.

Find out more about how to be involved in caring for our coastal environment through our Coastal Community Engagement Program.

Dune policy

Our policy for coastal dune management provides guidelines for dune management for non-urban, urban and major public dune areas and on identifying dune zones for primary, secondary and tertiary dune species.

SC6.4 City Plan policy - Coastal dune management

Bilinga dune revegetation works

Dune vegetation plays an important role in stabilising our dune systems, protecting nearby properties and beach users from wind and salt spray. It is also a natural shade tool.

This project aimed to restore dune amenity, increase the health of the dune system and enhance the recreational experience for residents and beach users in the Bilinga area.

On 24 June 2019 all cottonwood trees, coastal tea-tress and dead/vandalised trees were removed from the dune system from Archer Street to Mills Street, Bilinga. Removal of these trees have been undertaken to enable the revegetation works to proceed. The revegetation works consisted of landscaping along the seawall using native groundcovers and the replanting of tress in the dune area to replace the trees that were vandalised. Maintaining the dunes is an important part of our Ocean Beaches Strategy to ensure our beaches are healthy and clean.

Before works large number of dead and vandalised tree

11 May 2019 (before works)
Large number of dead and vandalised trees.

 
After stage 1 removal of dead and vandalised trees

11 July 2019 (after Stage 1)
Removal of dead and vandalised trees.

 
After revegetation new trees/ vegetation have been planted

14 October 2019 (after Revegetation Stage)
New trees/vegetation have been planted.

 

Click to enlarge
 

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